October 19, 2014

exgynocraticgrrl:

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013) , former Robinson Edwards Professor Emerita of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013)  Women and History (excerpt)
-- A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

(via cockleshells)

10:39am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYE9Jy1TXi_Rf
  
Filed under: women history 
October 4, 2014
"

October “Toby” Daye was in many ways my first “real” protagonist. She was complicated, she was sad, she was bruised and refusing to break, and she was not afraid to put her duty ahead of her desire to be liked. She bullied her way through the world she was created to inhabit, looking at every complication that stood in her way and saying “No, you move.” After a lifetime spent moving dolls through stories, it was like I finally had a real person to follow and document. I started writing her adventures, and sending them out to people I trusted to read and review. Midway through either the second or the third book—I don’t remember anymore—I got a note from one of my proofers saying “You can’t have Toby do this, she’s always been a little bitchy, but this makes her a total bitch. No one will like her if she does this.”

I panicked. I couldn’t write a series about an unlikeable character! I’d never get published, no one else would ever meet my imaginary friends, and everything I’d worked for my whole life would be over, all because Toby was unlikeable.

Then I took a deep breath, and wrote back to the proofer requesting that they do a find/replace on the .doc, and plug in the name “Harry Dresden” for every instance of “October Daye.” They did, and lo and behold, what had been “bitchy” and “inappropriate” was suddenly “bold” and “assertive.” A male character in the same situation, with the same background, taking the same actions, was completely in the right, justified, and draped with glory. He was a hero. Toby? Toby was an unlikeable bitch.

The proofer withdrew the compliant. I have never forgotten it.

"

seanan_mcguire: Characters, criteria, and causation: where the problem lies. (via helavik)

Absolutely amazing, and totally on point.

(via agentotter)

(via thewinterotter)

October 4, 2014
"

Some men push the button as far as saying that porn is actually ‘feminist’ because women make more money than men in the industry. To which I reply that men in porn are paid to orgasm, while women are paid to suffer, which is why they deserve and receive a higher monetary compensation. But money is a bad substitute for dignity and body integrity.

I am tired of men who, by wanting so hard to justify their porn use without acknowledging the harm done to women, over-rationalise some aspect of it while closing their eyes to the obvious. And when we ask them if they would like to be treated like the women in porn, they say ‘of course not, but that does not mean that those girls don’t, it is not because YOU won’t like these things to be done to your body that THEY do not like it’. Because ‘those girls’ are so different then us, regular human beings…

The fact is that women have been brainwashed to think that enduring pain is an integral part of their duty of performing femininity. Women harm their feet to walk in high heels. Women voluntarily submit themselves to painful surgeries to have bigger breast. They go through painful waxing procedures. Women are good women when they overcome their pain with a smile. And now, thanks to porn, girls are seeking advice on the internet about how to give deepthroated blowjobs without puking and how to make anal sex less painful. Men are never expected to do such things…

"

comment by MissFit on Porn Part 11: The Difference Between Huffing Dong and Flipping Burgers (via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

"men in porn are paid to orgasm, while women are paid to suffer" - and that is fucking crucial

(via sci-fi-loving-freak)

(via actualmenacebuckybarnes)

October 3, 2014

furthest-city-light:

modestdemidov:

"make up is false advertisement!"

translation:

"i view women as products"

Well that was succinct.

(via thebicker)

12:48pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYE9Jy1SHJ1rX
  
Filed under: makeup women 
October 3, 2014
dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

(via billtheradish)

September 27, 2014
kayinnasaki:

Cyber harassment study reveals the unsurprising!
It still amazes me that I talk to guys who still think they get harassed just as much as women online. Like even from people who aren’t clearly and totally gross dumbasses. It kinda makes me think that, even in the best cases, it might be hard to really understand the sheer difference in frequency. You see a woman get harassed on a game and you go “Oh well I’ve been harassed” without understanding that there is seldom a session for her where that doesn’t happen or understanding what her inbox might look like…

kayinnasaki:

Cyber harassment study reveals the unsurprising!

It still amazes me that I talk to guys who still think they get harassed just as much as women online. Like even from people who aren’t clearly and totally gross dumbasses. It kinda makes me think that, even in the best cases, it might be hard to really understand the sheer difference in frequency. You see a woman get harassed on a game and you go “Oh well I’ve been harassed” without understanding that there is seldom a session for her where that doesn’t happen or understanding what her inbox might look like…

(via cockleshells)

11:37am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYE9Jy1Rp0qH_
  
Filed under: women internet 
September 25, 2014

sapphicscience:

i’ve been thinking about all those posts about “we need female heroes who do girly things”/”why is the female hero always such a tomboy” and then the response posts that are like “uhhh actually we don’t really have any really masculine female heroes either” so i was trying to figure it out—what do we have, exactly?

and really what we get is women who eschew “girly” things while still managing to look like society’s ideal woman. they would never touch eyeliner (they’re too busy with Important Things), but their eyeliner is immaculate. they have a huge, varied wardrobe, but wouldn’t be caught dead actually shopping for clothes. and it reminds me of the expectation that women must be effortlessly beautiful. don’t wear makeup or you’ll seem self-absorbed—but god forbid you look like you’re not wearing makeup. it’s interesting to me, that the impossibilities imposed on female characters are the same ones imposed on real women.

(via actualmenacebuckybarnes)

September 18, 2014

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via ladyshinga)

September 3, 2014
"

But women can never be careful enough, can we? If we take naked pictures of ourselves, we’re asking for it. If someone can manage to hack into our accounts, we’re asking for it. If we’re not wearing anti-rape nail polish, we’re asking for it. If we don’t take self-defence classes, we’re asking for it. If we get drunk, we’re asking for it. If our skirts are too short, we’re asking for it. If we pass out at a party, we’re asking for it. If we are not hyper-vigilant every single fucking second of every single fucking day, we are asking for it. Even when we are hyper-vigilant, we’re still asking for it. The fact that we exist is asking for it.

This is what rape culture looks like.

This is what misogyny looks like.

"

— from What Happened to Jennifer Lawrence Was Sexual Assault  (via catagator)

(via ladyshinga)

September 2, 2014
Marvel Comics, the MCU, and Raising the Bar of what Fans Expect

marlowe-tops:

I think it’s significant that Marvel raised the bar. When Iron Man came out in 2008, it significantly changed our cultural standards for superhero movies. And then Marvel kept doing it. Each movie that came out in the MCU seemed better than the last. The female characters were far more than just love interests. The movies weren’t just about superpowered battles and cackling supervillains. Marvel’s movies talked about significant real world issues. They were about questions of military privatization, or cultural appropriation, or government surveillance. We learned to trust Marvel and to look forward to each new movie where the female characters were scientists and CEOs who had better things to do than to worry about their own romantic subplots.

In 2012, Kelly Sue DeConnick blew everyone away with her run of Carol Danvers, and some really amazing things happened. Marvel got a huge new contingent of new fans, mostly female, calling themselves the Carol Corps. And there was a lot of talk about what a huge deal this was, for anything to bring in new comic fans in this quantity. There started to be an outpouring of people talking about how they’d always wanted to get into comics but they felt like they weren’t welcome. (This isn’t to in any way discredit the incredible female fans and creators who long predated Captain Marvel’s 2012 run—let me tell you of my infinite love for anything written by the incomparable Gail Simone.) Captain Marvel changed that, and Marvel paid attention.

In 2013, catering to their new huge demographic of female fans, Marvel Comics put out a couple of all-female teams: the X-Men and the Fearless Defenders, neither of which had ever traditionally been all-female teams. X-Men continues strong, with a multi-ethnic all-female team. Fearless Defenders got canceled after a year due to poor readership, but surprisingly that didn’t discourage Marvel from continuing to cater to its new female demographic.

In 2013 and 2014, Captain Marvel’s run continues, and we’ve got a new Ms. Marvel who is a Muslim-American teenage girl getting fantastic readership and reviews. Black Widow’s got a new run going strong, Elektra and Storm are headlining their own titles, the new writer of Winter Soldier says that ‘feminism’ will be one of the title’s main themes, and the announcement of a new female Thor has sent a whirlwind through the industry. I’ve probably forgotten a few things because Marvel Comics is currently putting out so much worth being excited about for its female fans.

Marvel has been consistently raising the bar since 2008, in both their movies and their comics. There is a vast, varied and passionate fan following that has exploded in the wake of the new direction that Marvel has gone within their industry, both in movies and in comics. Millions of people who may not have known who Iron Man was in 2008 are now dedicated fans of all things Marvel. I’m one of them.

Which is why the backlash against Marvel’s refusal to put out a female-led superhero movie is just so angry and passionate. We got used to Marvel raising the bar. We learned to trust Marvel, and in many ways that peaked in April 2014 when Captain America: The Winter Soldier came out, with a female co-star who was not a romantic interest, for a movie that totally blew away the numbers at the box office, coinciding with many of the exciting things mentioned above going on in Marvel Comics.

Marvel raised the bar and people responded. Their fanbase expanded exponentially, their profits rocketed. But we’ve reached a point where the obvious next step to raise the bar again is to produce a female-led superhero movie that’s on par with the rest of the MCU canon, and Marvel—namely president Kevin Feige—is refusing. It isn’t that Feige’s stance has changed in any way in order to bring on this increasingly massive outpouring of frustration and demand for a female-led superhero movie. It’s that we’ve learned to expect that Marvel will raise the bar.

Guardians of the Galaxy didn’t do that. It was a fun movie, which had a lot of great things about it, but it didn’t raise any bars. And I don’t think anyone is expecting Ant-Man to raise any bars. The heads of Marvel have assumed that, at least when it comes to the MCU, its fan following is due to Marvel’s ability to put out great superhero movies. But the truth is that the MCU’s massive success and popularity is largely attributed to its ability to raise the bar of what people expect from superhero movies. And if you become known for raising the bar, that’s not a topic where you can rest on your laurels.

Female-led action movies like Hunger Games (or starring Scarlett Johansson in particular, like Lucy) make bank. Women purchase 52% of movie tickets and 46% of comics. There’s a market. There’s a demand. There’s a massive and vocal audience telling you exactly what they want you to produce.

C’mon, Marvel. Renew our faith in you. Raise the bar.

(via maggieblueberry)