09 7 / 2014

linnealurks:

ritchandspace:

tardiswanted:

Ladies and gentlemen, and variations thereupon

You know, I’m amazed that in all my time on tumblr, I’ve never seen a single post appreciating this lady. I mean, do you realise what is happening here?

This is clear and casual acceptance of gender non-conformity in mainstream media. And not only is this in Doctor Who, with an audience of millions and millions of people worldwide, but it’s also set in the future, implying that progress is not only spaceships and interplanetary colonisation, but also in the way of acceptance of identity outside the gender binary.

So yeah, let’s take a moment to appreciate the awesome lady in Doctor Who that was totally chill about trans* folk without making a big show of it. You go, girl*!
(*or gentleman, or variations thereof.)

Russell T Davies wrote these episodes, with these lines:

  • End of the World: Ladies and gentlemen and trees and multiforms…
  • The Long Game: Ladies, gentlemen, multi-sex, undecided or robot…
  • Midnight: Ladies and gentlemen, and variations thereupon…

In Russell T Davies’ futures, gender is always more complicated than today.  

Davies also created Jack Harkness, from a future (the 51st century) where sexuality is fluid (also Jack and the Face of Boe have both been said to carry pregnancies).  

On the other hand the Moffat years gave us this line:

"We’re the thin/fat, gay, Anglican marines: why would we need names as well?" 

Because its so funny and weird that out of hundreds of “anglican marines” in Demons Run in the 52nd century, that a fat guy and a thin guy would be a couple…ok….

And they’re literally credited at the end as “Fat One” and “Thin One”.   They’re purely a joke.

Is that how straight people see us?

Anyway, in the meantime (bringing us back to the original post), the fact that no one knew this Hostess’s name in “Midnight” is considered a major tragedy, because she is a hero.

(The episode also features a character named Sky who mentions her ex with she/her pronouns, and no one makes a big deal out of it.  Its entirely normal, and not a joke at all.)

I’m still wary of taking the media-friendly, chattering-classes stance that labels don’t matter, that we should chuck them in the bin; I’m labelled gay, and I love that label, I need it. Equally, if you’re working in a car factory and you’ve been closeted for the entire 50 years of your life, you’re carrying an awful and important label. They aren’t easily shrugged off. But maybe we need more labels. Like, five million more, and that’s just for starters.

We need a vocabulary that will fit the sheer complexity of ordinary men and women.

—Russell T. Davies

source (in sidebar)

(Source: tardisvvanted, via actualmenacebuckybarnes)

07 7 / 2014

brilliantfantasticgeronimo:

linnealurks:

classic-whovian-spinster-aunt:

clarabosswald:

goodbye i’m gone bye

#perhaps it’s the fact that twelve has a pose all about power and control while clara is all demure #he looks straight into the camera #challenging it #while she smiles sweetly and looks off to the side #one leg bent - one hand on the console #unsteady almost #certainly staged #this just has heteronormative gender roles written all over it #the oncoming patriarchy #is all i can see 
via thesilverdevastation
PRAISE THE TAGS


PRAISE THEM.
And in contrast, observe Rose Tyler, BAMF, in promo stills for Series 1:






Firmly rooted. Looking straight at the camera. NOT smiling.  Even when Nine is guarding her with his body, she’s directly engaging with whatever they’re confronting. And sometimes she’s looking at the viewer, or the action, and Nine is looking at *her*.  She’s a force to be reckoned with. She’s a force to be reckoned with.


#excellent tags are excellent#jfc moffat#twelfth doctor#clara oswald#the oncoming patriarchy#in contrast with#ninth doctor#rose tyler#bamf#i know that’s a lot of pictures#but i kept looking for counterexamples#and there weren’t any#someone who’s got more martha and donna promo pictures handy#should do some examples of their presentation

(credit to tragicalhistorytour)
/w martha



/w donna




and some more promo pics of rose but hanging out w/ ten:



honestly is rather hard to find promo pics from the 2005/2009(?) years where the doctor and the companion aren’t shown to be in equal footing, the closest i could find to the above situation was this, but it is a) not a very common shot?  i don’t remember eer seeing this particular ver of the promo pic, and b) rose is still showing a very confident stance, even if she’s not directly adressing the viewer like ten.

orrr maybe this one w/ donna? i think this one was used in one of the recent blue ray covers for s4.

ps LET’S NOT FORGET THAT amy promos started like this:

and ended like this:

brilliantfantasticgeronimo:

linnealurks:

classic-whovian-spinster-aunt:

clarabosswald:

goodbye i’m gone bye

 

via thesilverdevastation

PRAISE THE TAGS

PRAISE THEM.

And in contrast, observe Rose Tyler, BAMF, in promo stills for Series 1:

Firmly rooted. Looking straight at the camera. NOT smiling.  Even when Nine is guarding her with his body, she’s directly engaging with whatever they’re confronting. And sometimes she’s looking at the viewer, or the action, and Nine is looking at *her*.  She’s a force to be reckoned with. She’s a force to be reckoned with.

(via cockleshells)

05 7 / 2014

"Her mentality toward The Doctor can be summed up with a conversation she has with Amy in series 6. The Doctor has left them with instructions Amy does not want to do, but River tells her, “We’re going to [do] as The Doctor’s friends always do. As they’re told.” I think I just heard Rose, Martha, Donna, Romana, and Sarah Jane slap you."

31 5 / 2014

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

“Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

(via maggieblueberry)

06 5 / 2014

31 3 / 2014

clara-the-slytherin-graduate:

I find it really interesting that the historical men like Vincent Van Gogh, Winston Churchill and Richard Nixon portrayed in Moffat Who are always three dimensional and treated respectfully, while the historical women like Elizabeth the First and Nefertiti, are always love sick idiots drooling over the Doctor.

It almost seems like Moffat cannot take women seriously, even if they ruled nations.

(via cockleshells)

23 3 / 2014

"

I think the reason that lots of people think Steven Moffat’s version of Doctor Who is sexist is because it repeatedly acts and sounds sexist. It may be that Moffat consciously tries to craft his Who as feminist or pro-feminist. If so, I don’t think there’s any better illustration of the crucial point that, in a sexist society, however much of an ‘ally’ you may be, if you’re a man then you still enjoy male privilege, and probably don’t realise it half the time.

The Doctor describes Clara as “a mystery wrapped in an enigma squeezed into a skirt that’s just a little bit too tight”. The Doctor describes Marilyn Monroe as though she really was nothing more than the stereotypical ‘man crazy’ ditz she played in some of her movies. Rory likens being married to Amy to being trapped inside a giant robot duplicate of her. We get dialogue like “Why did she try to kill you and then want to marry you?” “Because she’s a woman”. Osgood, a scientist, is shown to be secretly obsessed with jealousy towards her prettier sister. A Dalek develops a female alter-ego, and she spends her time cooking.
[…]
In Moffat’s show, women are overwhelmingly defined by their traditional gender roles or bodily functions. It doesn’t matter that their excellence in these gender roles is praised by show and lead character. It doesn’t matter that we’re supposed to be impressed by the virtuosity with which River tricks people using her feminine wiles. It doesn’t change anything that the Doctor goes into rhapsodies about the wonders of motherhood. That isn’t liberating; it’s still the mapping of male, patriarchal conceptions of female value onto female characters.

River exists entirely because of the Doctor. Who the hell is River? She is an assemblage of gender essentialist tropes and wisecracks. When does she ever – beyond, arguably, her first appearance – behave like an academic or a scientist? When does she ever display anything resembling erudition or intellectual curiosity? When does she ever do or say anything to show or engender love? Admittedly, the Doctor seems to be sexually aroused by the way she shoots people… which is just charming. In ‘Let’s Kill Hitler’, she is incarnated as Mels, a character we’ve never seen or heard of before, and plonked unceremoniously into the story out of sheer, brazen convenience. She stalks Amy and Rory (her unwitting mother and father) for years, pretending to be their friend, all because of her pre-programmed monomaniacal desire to get to the Doctor. She regenerates while “concentrating on a dress size”. She spends the rest of the episode obsessing over her hair, clothes, shoes and weight. River’s instability is finally conquered by the love of a good man. This seems intensely hostile and patronising. If that isn’t what was aimed at, then somebody is a very bad shot.

It doesn’t matter that River is ‘powerful’. Fetishizing ‘power’ in women characters – having them kicking ass and always being ready with a putdown - isn’t the same as writing them as human beings.

"

Steven Moffat: a Case for the Prosecution

[…]The reason I feel ill when the Doctor snogs River’s ghost at the end of ‘Name of the Doctor’ is not that I hate emotion in Who, or that I want – because I’m a sexually and emotionally repressed nerd or something – Doctor Who to be emotionless.  Rather, the opposite of this is the truth.  The reason I feel ill at moments like that is rather that I hate fake emotion, cheap emotion, unearned emotion.  Commodified emotion.  Packaged, marketed, profitable, sugary, junk emotion.  Sentimentality, in other words. 

Sentimentality is disgusting because it’s not fundamentally about other people, or relationships.  It’s about oneself.  It’s self-regarding, self-comforting, self-pleasing.  It isn’t social.  It’s narcissistic.  This is precisely what is so horribly wrong with all those Moffatian emotional tornadoes.  How can they be touching when the characters and relationships are so shallow?  When we’re watching narcissists adoring their own reflections in their partner’s eyes?[…]
 I don’t like having to hate this show.  I want to love it.  

(via z3nmaster)

(Source: blake-wyatt, via cockleshells)

21 3 / 2014

stephadoo:

I think I’ve found my new favorite picture.

stephadoo:

I think I’ve found my new favorite picture.

(via mhalachai)

01 3 / 2014

21 2 / 2014

factsinallcaps:

WHEN THE WRITERS OF “DOCTOR WHO” FOUND OUT THAT DAVID TENNANT HAD TROUBLE SAYING WORDS ENDING WITH -OON WITHOUT REVERTING BACK TO HIS NATURAL SCOTTISH ACCENT, THEY WROTE AN ENTIRE EPISODE AND INVENTED A NEW TYPE OF ALIEN JUST SO THEY COULD MAKE HIM SAY “A JUDOON PLATOON UPON THE MOON.”

(via cockleshells)